sublim-ature:

Fjaðrárgljúfur, IcelandBryan Swan
expressions-of-nature:

Pink Lake Hillier in Australia | Andrea Maizzi

Lake Hillier is a pink-colored lake on Middle Island, the largest of the islands and islets that make up the Recherche Archipelago, Western Australia. From above the lake appears a solid bubble gum pink.
Unlike other pink lakes in the world like the one in Retba and the salt ponds at San Francisco Bay, the pink color of Lake Hillier has not been decisively proved, although it is speculated that the color could arise from a dye created by the organisms Dunaliella salina and Halobacteria. Another hypothesis is that the pink color is due to red halophilic bacteria in the salt crusts. That the color is not a trick of light can be proved by taking water from the lake in a container – the pink color can be found to be permanent.  

Information Source: via Amusing Planet

Milford Sound by (Tim Jordan Photography)
westeastsouthnorth:

Soufriere, St. Lucia
decepticun:

Light over Pattedale | by Tall Guy
Pulteney Bridge, Bath, England
submitted by: thescepteredisle, thanks!
Bridge over By Brook, Castle Combe, England
submitted by: thescepteredisle, thanks!
westeastsouthnorth:

Upolu, Tonga

englishsnow:

Keukenhof Gardens, Holland by Opiliones

(via suzysuzysue)

gypsyone:

Winter in Hawaii

(via thatsmoderatelyraven)

allthingseurope:

Château de Villandry Gardens, France (by Richard Parmiter)

chubbyant:

asylum-art:

This 144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan Looks Like A Pink Sky

These stunning photographs, which look like a glorious late evening sky with dashes of pink and purple, are actually pictures of Japan’s largest wisteria (or wistaria, depending on whom you ask) plant.

This plant, located in Ashikaga Flower Park in Japan, is certainly not the largest in the world, but it still comes in at an impressive 1,990 square meters (or half an acre) and dates back to around 1870 (the largest, at about 4,000 square meters, is the wisteria vine in Sierra Madre, California). Although wisterias can look like trees, they’re actually vines. Because its vines have the potential to get very heavy, this plant’s entire structure is held up on steel supports, allowing visitors to walk below its canopy and bask in the pink and purple light cast by its beautiful hanging blossoms.

Image credits: Takao Tsushima

You just want to lay out a blanket and lie under there!

(via thescepteredisle)

sublim-ature:

Victoria Falls, ZambiaAdrian Wright

huffingtonpost:

10 Reasons The Wilderness Act Was One Of The Best Ideas Ever

The Wilderness Act turns 50 this week, marking the anniversary of the preservation of some of our most treasured national lands. Passed in 1964, the Wilderness Act established the National Wilderness Preservation System and created the first official wilderness areas.

For more striking photos and inspiring quotes about nature go here. 

(via miss-oscurita)

Opaque  by  andbamnan