Finding the Right Path
Bagan, Myanmar | by mandalaybus
spaceandbeyond:

Edge of Creation by Bruce Omori

Wailua Falls
El Salvador | by rawmeyn
The Devil’s Throat
Iguazu Falls, Argentina/Brazil | by Jon Reid
Moonrise Dusk
Saguaro National Park, Arizona, USA | by Beau Rogers
Pure Iceland | by CoolBieRe
Heybeliada Island Turkey
submitted by: brightbluebella, thanks!
Sunset at Lake Tahoe
submitted by: memoirs-of-a-gringa, thanks!
Up Monte Baldo, Lake Garda, Italy
submitted by: because-she-way-out, thanks!

terra-mater:

Eye of the Sahara

The Richat Structure in the Sahara desert of Mauritania. This structure is a deeply eroded, slightly elliptical, 40 km in diameter, dome. The sedimentary rock exposed in this dome ranges in age from Late Proterozoic within the center of the dome to Ordovician sandstone around its edges.

Initially interpreted as an asteroid impact structure because of its high degree of circularity, it is now argued to be a highly symmetrical and deeply eroded geologic dome. Despite extensive field and laboratory studies, geologists have found a lack of any credible evidence for shock metamorphism or any type of deformation indicative of a hypervelocity extraterrestrial impact. While coesite, an indicator of shock metamorphism, had initially been reported as being present in rock samples collected from the Richat Structure, further analysis of rock samples concluded that barite had been misidentified as coesite.

In addition, the Richat Structure lacks the annular depression that characterizes large extraterrestrial impact structures of this size. Also, it is quite different from large extraterrestrial impact structures in that the sedimentary strata comprising this structure is remarkably intact and “orderly” and lacking in overturned, steeply dipping strata or disoriented blocks.

Moon over Mount Baker
Tsawwassen, British Columbia, Canada | by Alexis Birkill
plasmatics-life:

Braies - Italy by Gaia Mataloni | (Website)
treyratcliffphotos:

The Crazy Colors of Death Valley
I had no idea Death Valley would be so full of colors! Of course, the HDR process takes the existing colors and really helps them to stand out… and, as everyone knows, that’s perfectly cool with me!I was close to this area back in college when I used to have a double-major in geophysics and computer-science. I ended up dropping the geo bit of it because of a fight with the professor, but I’ve always kept my fascination with rocks. I don’t know enough about everything I see… like, when I see this below, I have a few ideas on what probably made it like this, but I don’t know for sure. Either way, it’s awesome… I’m glad for all the sulfur and iron in the area and its apparent randomness!- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.
beyondcrowds:

Portal
Upper Reed Lake, Alaska
Opaque  by  andbamnan